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Mika
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Re: Film Club

Post by Mika » 05 Nov 2016, 11:52

These are some movies I really want to see: Dead Poets Society (1989), What Dreams May Come (1998), The Fountain (2006), and The Tree of Life (2011)


Dead Poets Society
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A new English teacher, John Keating (Robin Williams), is introduced to an all-boys preparatory school that is known for its ancient traditions and high standards. He uses unorthodox methods to reach out to his students, who face enormous pressures from their parents and the school. With Keating's help, students Neil Perry (Robert Sean Leonard), Todd Anderson (Ethan Hawke) and others learn to break out of their shells, pursue their dreams and seize the day.
What Dreams May Come
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After Chris Nielsen (Robin Williams) dies in a car accident, he is guided through the afterlife by his spirit guide, Albert (Cuba Gooding Jr.). His new world is beautiful and can be whatever Chris imagines. Even his children are there. But, when his wife, Annie (Annabella Sciorra), commits suicide and is sent to hell, Chris ignores Albert's warnings and journeys there to save her. Upon arrival, Chris finds that rescuing Annie will be more difficult than he'd imagined.
The Fountain
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A man (Hugh Jackman) travels through time on a quest for immortality and to save the woman (Rachel Weisz) he loves. As a 16th-century conquistador, Tomas searches for the legendary Fountain of Youth. As a present-day scientist, he desperately struggles to cure the cancer that is killing his wife. Finally, as a 26th-century astronaut in deep space, Tom begins to grasp the mysteries of life, love and death.
The Tree of Life
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In this highly philosophical film by acclaimed director Terrence Malick, young Jack (Hunter McCracken) is one of three brothers growing up as part of the O'Brien family in small-town Texas. Jack has a contentious relationship with his father (Brad Pitt), but gets along well with his beautiful mother (Jessica Chastain). As an adult, Jack (Sean Penn) struggles with his past and tries to make sense of his childhood, while also grappling with bigger existential issues.
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Ants
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Re: Film Club

Post by Ants » 05 Nov 2016, 12:14

random movies to watch

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ik7BU-Tejcc&t=4s[/youtube]



contact me on discord (username: official dana scully fan guy)

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PanicAtTheDisco
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Re: Film Club

Post by PanicAtTheDisco » 06 Nov 2016, 08:10

Seth wrote:These are some movies I really want to see: Dead Poets Society (1989), What Dreams May Come (1998), The Fountain (2006), and The Tree of Life (2011)


Dead Poets Society
Image

A new English teacher, John Keating (Robin Williams), is introduced to an all-boys preparatory school that is known for its ancient traditions and high standards. He uses unorthodox methods to reach out to his students, who face enormous pressures from their parents and the school. With Keating's help, students Neil Perry (Robert Sean Leonard), Todd Anderson (Ethan Hawke) and others learn to break out of their shells, pursue their dreams and seize the day.

The Tree of Life
Image

In this highly philosophical film by acclaimed director Terrence Malick, young Jack (Hunter McCracken) is one of three brothers growing up as part of the O'Brien family in small-town Texas. Jack has a contentious relationship with his father (Brad Pitt), but gets along well with his beautiful mother (Jessica Chastain). As an adult, Jack (Sean Penn) struggles with his past and tries to make sense of his childhood, while also grappling with bigger existential issues.
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These movies I've planned to watch too. Dead Poets Society is probably the one that's caught my eye the most. I've had people mention it and quote it with me before.

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Mika
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Re: Film Club

Post by Mika » 06 Nov 2016, 19:59

PanicAtTheDisco wrote:
Seth wrote:These are some movies I really want to see: Dead Poets Society (1989), What Dreams May Come (1998), The Fountain (2006), and The Tree of Life (2011)


Dead Poets Society
Image

A new English teacher, John Keating (Robin Williams), is introduced to an all-boys preparatory school that is known for its ancient traditions and high standards. He uses unorthodox methods to reach out to his students, who face enormous pressures from their parents and the school. With Keating's help, students Neil Perry (Robert Sean Leonard), Todd Anderson (Ethan Hawke) and others learn to break out of their shells, pursue their dreams and seize the day.

The Tree of Life
Image

In this highly philosophical film by acclaimed director Terrence Malick, young Jack (Hunter McCracken) is one of three brothers growing up as part of the O'Brien family in small-town Texas. Jack has a contentious relationship with his father (Brad Pitt), but gets along well with his beautiful mother (Jessica Chastain). As an adult, Jack (Sean Penn) struggles with his past and tries to make sense of his childhood, while also grappling with bigger existential issues.
[/color]
These movies I've planned to watch too. Dead Poets Society is probably the one that's caught my eye the most. I've had people mention it and quote it with me before.
I'd love to watch it with you. c;
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Re: Film Club

Post by PanicAtTheDisco » 11 Nov 2016, 21:39

Here's another lame áss entry of me talking about a movie.

So, I just watched Doctor Strange, and might I add how much I loved it?
It was fantastic. Probably one of my favorites since The Avengers. However,
there's a thread for that as it is so I'm going to let that roll over and bring
up something barely ANYONE knows of.

It's called Mommy (2014).


I've been growing crooked these past few days, and I hope that I slowly
bring myself out of this melancholic abyss after an unfortunate news
was brought upon me. I decided to do that by drowning myself in this
depressant of a movie, and I contemplated on whether I should do this or
Swiss Army Man today.

I'll chose this one since I'm in the most troubled mood since I moved in Orlando.

"A peculiar neighbor offers hope to a recent widow who is struggling to
raise a teenager who is unpredictable and, sometimes, violent" (letterboxd).

This is the synopsis. And what is this movie? Raw. Just raw emotions and
raw personalities. I loved these characters yet I despised them. There are
barely any significant characters in this film. Pinpointing them on first viewing:
Steve Després, Diane "Die" Després, and Kyla. I'm dismissing Kyla.

Now there are most pivotal characters, but this film focuses on these three.
Steve..is difficult. He is foul-mouthed, impulsive, abusive, playful, charismatic,
talkative. He is incredibly destructive and incredibly heartwarming. Diane is a
lousey mother, but she is trying. She's trying so hard.

Let's get this out of the way: the camera was good, the lighting and atmosphere
filled the occasion. It had intense, stressful lighting then there was dim, dark,
tranquil lighting. The choices of scenes were well chosen. The dialogue was well
taken care of even though Steve cussed 90% of the time.

But can I just say I've never felt so much attachment towards such a despicable boy
and such a stumbling mother? They're so vulnerable; it almost feels like you could
pluck their veins. The director obviously knew what he was doing to make such
a horrible boy gain my sympathy. For fvck's sake, he called someone the n word,
groped the boobs of Kyla, almost killed his mother, and just - well - everything
was wrong.
Seriously, he caught a kid on fire with a $100,000+ charge over
his head. Diane is now spoiling her own child that could have easily killed a young
boy.

For a movie that plays on the more realistic terms of human interaction, that's
a big deal. She's not rich either. She has no money for this, and for the most of
us, we'd tell her to just drop the kid or something.

She isn't having it. This is her child. This is everything to her. It is all she has left.
And with that I still felt my heart go out to him.

You see him stumble. Triumph. Be happy. Be playful. Make an effort. Only for him
to stumble right back into his own hell. Why? His father died and his mother put him in
boarding school - with an attachment disorder. He's shown more vulnerable
and afraid than anything else in this film.

Even in the most climatic scene, you just want to make sure he's okay. His nature is
like that of a child. He doesn't know. He doesn't have social awareness. He is incapable
of controlling himself. And is that his fault? Yes and no.

His mother isn't the most nurturing. She doesn't know what the hell to do with him
but she gives him a car even after the fire incident and bill, lets him smoke, doesn't
properly discipline him when he berates, insults or fights people. Just when she lets
him off to the hospital, she demands her child back. She screams for him back.

He's screwy, she's screwy yet I love them.

I've come to terms with the idea that this movie was so well crafted in its characters.
It's very character driven. The conclusion is just a cut off. He is escaping. He is simply
running. Diane is alone again as Kyle leaves her.

There's so much in this movie that I want to express but this is dragging very long.
I will stop this here.

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Ants
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Re: Film Club

Post by Ants » 11 Nov 2016, 21:42

Mommy is fantastic
contact me on discord (username: official dana scully fan guy)

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PanicAtTheDisco
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Re: Film Club

Post by PanicAtTheDisco » 11 Nov 2016, 21:50

Ants wrote:Mommy is fantastic
It is; I watched it yesterday. I never anticipated how much I enjoyed it
but I'd definitely rewatch it again to make absolute of everything.

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Re: Film Club

Post by PanicAtTheDisco » 24 Nov 2016, 12:58

Surprise! Here I am, once again.

I was thinking of doing a different from the one I'm
about to discuss but here it is, my opinion on a movie
I just finished.



Hacksaw Ridge
"When the order came to retreat. One man stayed.

WWII American Army Medic Desmond T. Doss, who
served during the Battle of Okinawa, refuses to kill
people and becomes the first Conscientious Objector
in American history to win the Congressional Medal
of Honor" (letterboxd).


This movie stood out to me to be different just like
our main protagonist sets himself to be. He's a little
hard to love at first; he comes off really awkward because
his love interest is what drives him to be a bit clumsy. But
as the war rages on, you can't help but love him for standing
to what he believes in.

What I already liked at the beginning of the movie is
that they show "Prelude to War." Why is this something
I favor? Because I learned about it, and it's a propaganda
film.

See, what's so special about this story is that our protagonist
won't kill people in a war. Won't even touch a gun. You're spent
a good long time in the middle of the movie looking at the heinous
acts of war, something I felt that they dragged on way too much,
for the sake of telling you that this is not romantic. The love
story we are given heavily buries the mood of war that we are excited
to see it, but then we get out there and it's just a gorey mess.

The heroism that's pinpointed in this movie is a medic. He has
no kill count. He just repeats to himself "just one more" and he
saves lives. The audience is left with feelings of terror when
Desmond gets caught in multiple situations where he could've
used a gun. Harder on himself, but not impossible.

What I like, in addition, is that our Desmond saves Japanese lives.
That's something because "Prelude to War" encourages that we stay
patriotic. Signs of mercy for the enemy is HEAVILY frowned upon;
sympathy for the enemy, especially when you're going out to war, is
a risky price not many people are willing to take. Even the other
American soldiers say things like "we have to kill those Japs." Offensive.
Hateful. Discrimination. The ingredients of war. Yet here, you are
given the chance to look at the vulnerability of an enemy. You see
their beliefs too. Just for those brief moments you are given the chance
to feel mercy for them.

Desmond wants to support his motherlands, but he is aware that there
are people, just like him, that are fighting for their motherlands too.
He rescues his men along with the enemy because he understands
that they are people to, and God wants us to love even our enemies.

The topic of religion is evident and reminding. It's not obnoxious, and
it serves to be a very good blend to suffice the motives of Desmond. The
comedic side of this story - love/hate relationship. I mean I loved that
it's in there; it gives a softer tone to the movie. But that's what also
just puts me off. I'm in different states of the movie when I go through
Romanticism, domestic abuse, religion, humor, and patriotism.
There's so much!

But I think that's what drove this story to be so clear-cut.

Very beautiful shots. True to war. Interesting set of characters (though
I didn't feel need to be introduced to a few of them; they weren't memorable).
Decent use of time - some scenes weren't necessary (e.i. the final "come
back home to me" scene) in my opinion and sometimes things just
dragged a bit too long to keep me glued to the story.

Great film.

† Desmond Doss †
February 7, 1919 - March 23, 2006

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Re: Film Club

Post by OugiJean » 27 Nov 2016, 19:40

The Raid 2 honestly has some of the best action scenes in a kung fu movie ever! Loved the part where the hero was in prison and started taking on other prisoners in the bathroom. So many of them trying to get at him. That was Pretty wild in my opinion...

The final fight where he goes up against this one dude in the kitchen was personally my favorite out of all the fights because the way they started it was unique. That is some old school stuff if i may say so. Never seen something like that before. It does hold my interest where they could possibly take the third installment...

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Re: Film Club

Post by PanicAtTheDisco » 27 Nov 2016, 20:11

OugiJean wrote:The Raid 2 honestly has some of the best action scenes in a kung fu movie ever! Loved the part where the hero was in prison and started taking on other prisoners in the bathroom. So many of them trying to get at him. That was Pretty wild in my opinion...

The final fight where he goes up against this one dude in the kitchen was personally my favorite out of all the fights because the way they started it was unique. That is some old school stuff if i may say so. Never seen something like that before. It does hold my interest where they could possibly take the third installment...
I don't even think I've heard of this movie, but I managed to look it up to see the premise. Is the second one just overall better than the first or is it just the action scenes?

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